Tag Archives: 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is a Jupiter-family comet, originally from the Kuiper belt (a circumstellar disc in the Solar System beyond the planets, extending from the orbit of Neptune -at 30 AU- to approximately 50 AU from the Sun. It is similar to the asteroid belt, but it is far larger: 20 times as wide and 20 to 200 times as massive), with a current orbital period of 6.45 years, a rotation period of approximately 12.4 hours and a maximum velocity of 135,000 km/h (38 km/s; 84,000 mph). Churyumov–Gerasimenko is approximately 4.3 by 4.1 km (2.7 by 2.5 mi) at its longest and widest dimensions. It was first observed on photographic plates in 1969 by Soviet astronomers Klim Ivanovych Churyumov and Svetlana Ivanovna Gerasimenko, after whom it is named. It came to perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) on 13 August 2015.

67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko
Mosaic of four images taken by Rosetta’s navigation camera (NAVCAM) on 19 September 2014 at 28.6 km (17.8 mi) from the centre of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The images used for this mosaic were taken in sequence as a 2×2 raster over an approximately 20 minute period, meaning that there is some motion of the spacecraft and rotation of the comet between the images. Note this mosaic has been rotated by 180 degrees and cropped. The mosaic has been put together using Microsoft ICE. This left a few small regions requiring slight exposure adjustments using Adobe LightRoom. The full image has then been lightly contrast enhanced to bring out the activity without increasing the background noise too much. Photo: wikipedia

Churyumov–Gerasimenko was the destination of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission, launched on 2 March 2004. Rosetta rendezvoused with Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 6 August 2014 and entered orbit on 10 September 2014. Rosetta’s lander, Philae, touched down on its surface on 12 November 2014, becoming the first spacecraft to land on a comet nucleus.

Source: 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on wikipedia

Where Earth’s water came from?

Earth is a blue marble in the space: the water, gives our planet its blue color: about 71 percent of the Earth’s surface is water-covered. There is roughly 326 million cubic miles (1.332 billion cubic kilometers) water on the Earth’s surface. Almost 97% of that water is salty (ocean water). But where all that water came from?
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Philae (Rosetta’s Lander) Wakes Up From Hibernation

Good news! ESA’s (European Space Agency) robotic lander Philae finally received enough solar radiation and now is out of hibernation. On the Rosetta blog, the ESA announced that “The signals were received at ESA’s European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt at 22:28 CEST on 13 June. More than 300 data packets have been analysed by the teams at the Lander Control Center at the German Aerospace Center (DLR).” It is the first contact with the spacecraft since going into hibernation in November.
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