The Expanse: there was an easter egg in the final episode

In the final episode of the Science-Fiction series “The Expanse”, there was an easter egg for the science-fiction lovers. During the Second Battle of Medina station (previously the LDSS Nauvoo, later known as OPAS Behemoth), there was a screen on the deck of Rocinante showing the names of attacking soldiers. These names were taken from various science-fiction movies/TV shows.

Continue reading “The Expanse: there was an easter egg in the final episode”

Tonga’s Hunga volcano eruption from space, amazing video

Satellite imagery captures Tonga’s Hunga volcano erupting. The Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano erupted for the second time in 2 days and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) GOES-West satellite captured imagery of the eruption. The eruption also triggered a tsunami that hit the South Pacific Kingdom of Tonga. This time-lapse video composed of images taken from space shows how powerful the eruption was.

Continue reading “Tonga’s Hunga volcano eruption from space, amazing video”

Stranded in space: the story of Sergei Krikalev, the last Soviet cosmonaut

Soviet cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev (born August 27, 1958) was in space when the Soviet Union fell apart in 1991. He was stranded on board the Mir Space Station during the dissolution of the USSR. As the country that had sent him into space no longer existed, his return was delayed until further notice. He stayed in orbit for 311 consecutive days, twice as long as the original duration of the mission. He eventually returned back to earth – to a very different nation.

Continue reading “Stranded in space: the story of Sergei Krikalev, the last Soviet cosmonaut”

10 Coolest Ways to Transform Waste for Housing

Home building and design have come a long way. While most homes rely on materials like concrete, plaster, and masonry, new technologies are making it easier to convert construction and household waste into usable materials – opening up more doors for eco-friendly buildings.

Continue reading “10 Coolest Ways to Transform Waste for Housing”

3 Benefits of Using Smart Mooring In Monitoring Climate Change

One of the parts most damaged by the current rate of climate change is Earth’s bodies of water. Scientific forecasts have estimated that in the next century, almost all coral reef habitats on our planet will be decimated. This is largely due to continuing ocean acidification among other practices done by humans, which all drastically destroy our coral reefs and underwater ecosystems.

Continue reading “3 Benefits of Using Smart Mooring In Monitoring Climate Change”

NASA introduces a new logo for extending International Space Station operations through 2030

On December 31, 2021, the Biden-Harris administration extended the International Space Station (ISS) operations through 2030. Today, NASA has introduced a new International Space Station logo for extending operations.

Continue reading “NASA introduces a new logo for extending International Space Station operations through 2030”

Early Earth was a horrible place for Life because of UV radiation

Earth has had a long and complex history since its formation roughly 4.5 billion years ago. Initially, it was a molten ball, but eventually, it cooled and became differentiated. The Moon was formed from a collision between Earth and a protoplanet named Theia (probably), the oceans formed, and at some point in time, about 4 billion years ago, simple life appeared.

Continue reading “Early Earth was a horrible place for Life because of UV radiation”

Ocean Acidification: Mapping the Impact of Carbon Emissions on the Oceans

The climate crisis and the chemistry of the oceans are inextricably connected. The oceans have absorbed close to a third of our carbon dioxide emissions since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, leading to an increasingly acidic environment (hence the term, the Ocean Acidification) and making it more difficult for organisms such as corals, mollusks, and plankton to form their shells and skeletons.

Mapping future changes in ocean chemistry is the first step in developing mitigation strategies. However, our knowledge of the future state of the oceans relies on mathematical models that are often not calibrated with modern ship-based observations.

Dr. Li-Qing Jiang of the University of Maryland and his collaborators are improving ocean acidification predictions by coupling millions of past and present ocean chemistry measurements with the best model projections at each location of the global ocean.

Continue reading “Ocean Acidification: Mapping the Impact of Carbon Emissions on the Oceans”