Two neutron stars collided near the solar system 4.6 billion years ago

According to a new study published in the May 2, 2019 issue of Nature, 4.6 billion years ago, two neutron stars collided near the early Solar System (actually about 1000 light years from the gas cloud that eventually formed the Solar System.). This violent collision has created heavy elements like silver, gold, platinum, cesium, and uranium. Study says 0.3% of the Earth’s heaviest elements have been created by this event.

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InSight captures a sunrise, sunset, and clouds on Mars

NASA’s Mars InSight lander captured a series of sunrise, sunset, and clouds images. On April 24 and 25, 2019 (the 145th Martian day, or sol, of the mission), Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC) on the spacecraft’s robotic arm captured sunrise and sunsets. Another camera, called Instrument Context Camera (ICC) beneath the lander’s deck captured drifting clouds across the Martian sky at sunset.

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Did European Colonisation precipitate the Little Ice Age?

Many of us think that rapid environmental change is a quintessentially modern crisis. Today, temperatures are soaring, topsoil is washing away, phosphorous is being diluted, forests are retreating, pesticides are sterilising farmland, fertilisers are choking waterways, and biodiversity is plummeting under the onslaught of overpopulated, industrialised societies. Some of these changes are indeed truly new. But many others have deep roots and distant echoes in the early modern period, the years between around 1400 and 1800 when much of the world began to assume its present form. Recently, scientists, geographers, historians, and archaeologists have combined expertise and evidence to reveal just how profound early modern environmental transformations really were.

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The Melting Points of 80 Elements, Substances, and Metal Alloys

Have you ever wondered why plastic melts in a bonfire, but a cast iron pan doesn’t? A bonfire can reach temperatures as hot as 2,012 °F (1,100 °C). Most PET plastic melts at a measly 491 °F (255 °C), so it doesn’t stand a chance! Cast iron prevails with an average melting point of 2,100 °F (1,150 °C), depending on the iron-carbon alloy proportions.

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Brasilian couple plants 2 million trees, creates a new forest

In the early 2000s, famed Brasilian photographer Sebastião Salgado and his wife Lélia decided to rebuild their deserted piece of land of 600 hectares in Aimorés, Brazil. They planted more than 2 million tree saplings in 18 years.

And the result is amazing!They created a new forest, and now, the site has 293 plant species, 172 bird species and 33 animal species, some of which were on the verge of extinction.

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Timelapse of the future: an amazing video

Melodysheep published an amazing video titled “Timelapse of the future: a journey to the end of time”. This experience takes us on a journey to the end of time, trillions of trillions of years into the future, to discover what the fate of our planet, our sun, and our universe may ultimately be.

If this video won’t give you goosebumps, I don’t know what will.

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