Beresheet, Israel’s first moon mission spacecraft sends back selfie with Earth

Beresheet (which means “Genesis” in Hebrew), Israel’s first Moon mission spacecraft has sent an amazing selfie with Earth in the background today.

In the photo, a plaque on the side of moon lander features the flag of Israel and phrases “Am Yisrael Chai” (which means roughly “The Jewish nation lives” or “the people of Israel are still alive”) and “small country, big dreams”.

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Yes, buddy, that’s your Mother Earth. Isn’t she beautiful?

American astronaut Anne McClain, who is a part of Expedition 58/59 to the International space station, shared the beautiful (and cute) photo below on her Twitter account, saying “Yes, buddy, that’s your Mother Earth. Isn’t she beautiful?”.

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How to keep your life routine in energy-saving rhythm?

Saving energy in today’s digital world is sometimes nigh impossible. Anything you want to do has something to do with electricity in terms of powering your computer or giving you access to the internet.

But how can you create an eco-friendly life routine with energy saving in mind? You can save energy and keep doing everything you have been doing so far, in a slightly changed, greener way.

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The First Commercial Crew Mission Arrives at the ISS

On March 3, 2019, at 10:51 UTC (05:51 EST), SpaceX Demo-1 Crew Dragon autonomously docked to the International Space Station’s Harmony module forward International Docking Adapter (IDA), becoming the first commercial crew spacecraft arrived at the International Space Station (ISS). Here’s the video of the docking process.

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We are pumping 10 times more carbon into the atmosphere than when there were palm trees in the Arctic

Around 55.5 million years ago, there was a time period with more than 5°C – 8 °C warmer global average temperature than today, which named “Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum” (PETM). As a result, there were crocodiles and even crocodiles in the Arctic and the region was completely ice-free. Now, a new study suggests that if we keep burning fossil fuels at the current rate, the Earth will be again 8 degrees warmer within the next few hundred years. We’re going to face another PETM-like event soon.

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How seeing snakes in the grass helped primates to evolve

Evolution has favoured the modification and expansion of primate vision. Compared with other mammals, primates have, for example, greater depth perception from having forward-facing eyes with extensively overlapping visual fields, sharper visual acuity, more areas in the brain that are involved with vision, and, in some primates, trichromatic colour vision, which enables them to distinguish red from green hues. In fact, what separates primates from other mammals most is their much greater reliance on vision as the main sensory interface with the environment.

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FarFarOut: the new farthest object in our solar system

In December 2018, astronomers discovered the farthest known object in our solar system, which is about 120 times farther than Earth is from the Sun (120 Astronomical Units -AU) and named it “Farout” (far-out-there). But its record didn’t last long. Now, while searching for the hypothetical Planet X, Scott Sheppard, an astronomer at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. has found what might be the most distant object ever identified in the Solar System. It orbits the Sun at a massive distance of 140 Astronomical Units (AU), and for now, the astronomers are jokingly calling the new object “FarFarOut”.

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