Run by a Dutch restoration specialist who remastering historic videos using Artificial Intelligence (AI), the Dutch Steam Machine (Dutchsteammachine) channel has published remastered Apollo Moon landing videos, as well as some other vintage space videos, and the results are astonishing.

Apollo Moon landing videos remastered
Apollo Moon landing videos remastered: Apollo 16 Lunar Rover. Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke take the lunar rover for a spin on the surface of the moon in this film footage of what became known as the “Lunar Rover Grand Prix”.

In NASA’s moon landing videos (as well as other vintage space videos like Gemini missions), the film restorer behind Dutch Steam Machine, who also goes by “Niels,” used Artificial Intelligence (AI) to stabilize blurry footage and create new frames; raising the frame rate (the number of frames that play per second), smoothed the motion, and made them look more like high definition (HD) videos.

For example, in the original NASA footage, the Apollo 16 Lunar Rover video “Grand Prix” looked like below (note that it is very shaky):

Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke take the lunar rover for a spin on the surface of the moon in this film footage of what became known as the “lunar rover Grand Prix”. This footage was shot on 16mm film and is silent.

And the remastered version of the Apollo 16 Lunar Rover “Grand Prix” video below:

Moon landing videos remastered: Apollo 16 in 60fps: Grand Prix

Vintage space and Moon landing videos remastered – playlist

Here are the complete playlist of the vintage space and Moon landing videos remastered by the Dutch’s Team Machine channel.

The complete playlist of the vintage space and Moon landing videos remastered by the Dutch’s Team Machine channel.

Apollo Program

Also known as Project Apollo, The Apollo program was the third United States human spaceflight program after Project Mercury (1958-1963) and Project Gemini (1965-1966).

It was carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) between 1961 and 1972, which succeeded in landing the first humans on the Moon from 1969 to 1972.

Apollo Program in a nutshell

NASA’s Apollo program set several major human spaceflight milestones. It stands alone in sending crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit (see notes 1). Apollo 8 was the first crewed spacecraft to orbit another celestial body. Apollo 8 crew also witnessed the first Earthrise in history. Apollo 11 was the first crewed spacecraft to land humans on one.

Overall the Apollo program returned 842 pounds (382 kg) of lunar rocks and soil to Earth, greatly contributing to the understanding of the Moon’s composition and geological history.

The program laid the foundation for NASA’s subsequent human spaceflight capability, and funded construction of its Johnson Space Center and Kennedy Space Center. Apollo also spurred advances in many areas of technology incidental to rocketry and human spaceflight, including avionics, telecommunications, and computers.

Notes

  1. A low Earth orbit (LEO) is, as the name suggests, an orbit that is relatively close to Earth’s surface. It is normally at an altitude of less than 1000 km (620 miles) but could be as low as 160 km (100 miles) above Earth – which is low compared to other orbits, but still very far above Earth’s surface. For example, the International Space Station (ISS) orbits Earth in the Low Earth Orbit at an average altitude of 405 km (250 miles).

Sources

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