Category Archives: Life on Earth

Two kangaroos get into boxing match (video)

Somewhere in the Central Coast of Australia, two kangaroos are caught on camera in an intense boxing match on a suburban street. The marsupials can be seen punching and kicking each other close to houses in Central Coast, New South Wales. It is not clear where the action was filmed.

In this incredible video below, the funny fight goes on for more than five minutes. Luckily, both kangaroos were OK and not seriously harmed after the match.

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Great white shark fight caught on camera (video)

The Great White Sharks, kings of the seas. They are fearless hunters. And they are big: a mature individual can grow up to 6.4 m (21 ft) in length (there are even reports of great white sharks measuring over 8 m (26 ft), and 3,324 kg (7,328 lb) in weight). According to Wikipedia, “The great white shark has no natural predators other than the Orca.” But this is not always true. Sometimes, great whites attacks and even hunt each other.

Even though the great whites are known to generally avoid conflicts with each other, the phenomenon of cannibalism is not alien to this species. This rare phenomenon, has been caught on camera recently: London-born diver Adam Malski (33) filmed a fight between two great white sharks 50 kilometers off the coast of South Australia’s Neptune Islands.

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Will We Ever Visit Other Stars?

The Earth is our one and only home. As Carl Sagan said (Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space), “On Earth, everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”.

But will we ever leave our home and visit other stars in the future?

Our galaxy, “The Milky Way” is a barred spiral galaxy (a spiral galaxy with a central bar-shaped structure composed of stars) some 100,000-120,000 light-years in diameter, which contains 100-400 billion stars. It may contain at least as many planets as well. Our Sun (the Solar System) is located within the disk, about 27,000 light-years away from the Galactic Center, on the inner edge of one of the spiral-shaped concentrations of gas and dust called the Orion Arm.

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Sleeping cat and dog

I took these photos last week in Bodrum, Turkey. A stray cat and stray dog sleeping together in the same place, very closely. Beautiful.

The traditional belief that cats and dogs are natural enemies is not true. If appropriately socialized, cats and dogs may have relationships that are not antagonistic, and dogs raised with cats may prefer the presence of cats to other dogs. But unsocialized cats and dogs usually don’t like each other.

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Giant Weta – The Heaviest Insect on Earth

In the small islands of New Zealand, the world’s heaviest insect lives – The Giant weta. There are 70 types of species of weta in the genus Deinacrida of the family Anostostomatidae. Giant weta is endemic to New Zealand and is an example of island gigantism: which is a biological phenomenon leading to a larger size than their mainland relatives because of their isolation and lack of large predators. A female giant weta filled with eggs can reach up to 70 grams or more!

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Pale Blue Dot

The farthest spacecraft from Earth, NASA’s Voyager 1 Notes 1 probe took a photo of planet Earth in 1990, from a record distance of about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles, 40 AU) from Earth. The photo is known as the Pale Blue Dot. In the photograph, Earth is shown as a fraction of a pixel (0.12 pixel in size) against the vastness of space. It was a part of the solar system Family Portrait series of images.

The Voyager 1 spacecraft, which had completed its primary mission and was leaving the Solar System, was commanded by NASA to turn its camera around and to take a photograph of Earth across a great expanse of space, at the request of Carl Sagan Notes 2.

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