Category Archives: Places

Alternative Seven Wonders Of The World

The Seven Wonders of the World, describes seven great constructions known in the Hellenistic period – that’s why they are also known as the “Seven Wonders of the Ancient World”. In fact, in the Hellenistic era, each famous traveler had his own version of the list, but the best known and earliest surviving was from a poem by Greek-speaking epigrammist Antipater of Sidon, which he described in a poem composed about 140 BC:

“I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the Colossus of the Sun, and the huge labor of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, ‘Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand.'”

But, in fact, all seven wonders of the world existed at the same time for a period of less than 60 years. And now, only the Great Pyramid of Giza still in existence. All the others somehow gone.

If Antipater of Sidon was living in the more recent times, say 19th century, he probably would prepare a very different list. Here are the alternative seven wonders of the world that still exist today (with the images and videos):
Continue reading Alternative Seven Wonders Of The World

Top 10 Wettest Places on Earth

Earth is still the only planet we know where water can exist in liquid form on the surface and the water is vital for all known forms of life. Rain brings life: it is a major component of the water cycle (also known as hydrologic cycle, the continuous movement of water on, above and below the surface of the Earth) and is responsible for depositing most of the fresh water on the Earth. Here are the top ten wettest places on Earth.
Continue reading Top 10 Wettest Places on Earth

What if a nuclear bomb hit your city?

On August 6, 1945, during the World War II, an American Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber named “Enola Gay” dropped the world’s first deployed atomic bomb codenamed “Little Boy” over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The bomb exploded with 15 kilotons of TNT (63 TJ) of energy and caused horrendous destruction to the city. Approximately 66,000 people were killed as a direct result of the blast, and 69,000 were injured to varying degrees. Within four months, the number of the fatalities would reach 90,000–146,000 people due to the acute effects of the atomic bomb.
Continue reading What if a nuclear bomb hit your city?

Drone Footage Of The Himalayas, in HD!

Extreme sports media company based in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Teton Gravity Research released the first ultra HD drone footage of the Himalayas. The footage shot with the GSS C520 system, one of the most advanced 5-axis gyro-stabilized camera system in the world. Filmed from a helicopter with a crew flying from Kathmandu at 4,600 feet (1,400 meters) up to 24,000 feet (7,300 meters) on supplemental oxygen, these are some of the most stable, crisp, clear aerial shots of these mountains ever released, which include Mount Everest, Ama Dablam, and Lhotse.

Sound design and mix by Jeff Cormack at Play+Record.
Continue reading Drone Footage Of The Himalayas, in HD!

Whiteface Mountain (New York) hits -114 °F (-81.11 °C) wind chill at its summit

While the New York city suffers the coldest Valentine’s Day in 100 years, as East Coast is hit with record-low wind chill of -36 °F (-37.77 °C), the Whiteface Mountain reached -114 °F (-81.11 °C) wind chill at its summit. And it was even colder than the windchill in Antarctica.
Continue reading Whiteface Mountain (New York) hits -114 °F (-81.11 °C) wind chill at its summit

Top Ten Most Beautiful Earth Images Taken From the International Space Station in 2015

The astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) occasionally take photos of Earth. Some of them are really cool. Here are the top ten most beautiful (well, IMHO, of course) earth images taken from the ISS in 2015.
Continue reading Top Ten Most Beautiful Earth Images Taken From the International Space Station in 2015

Around the World in Eighty Days

When I was a child, one of my favorite books was (and still is) Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days. Published in 1873, the novel tells the story of Phileas Fogg, an English gentleman, and his newly employed French valet Passepartout. Fogg is a member of the Reform Club, a private members club on the south side of Pall Mall in central London. While the club members talking about the recent advances in technology, especially the new transportation methods including railway, Fogg sees an article in The Daily Telegraph stating that “with the opening of a new railway section in India, it is now possible to travel around the world in 80 days”. Other club members are skeptical about this claim. But Fogg insists it is doable.
Continue reading Around the World in Eighty Days

Top 10 driest places on Earth

Earth, the blue planet: the oceans combined with the atmosphere makes the planet look blue. So its color mainly comes from water. About 71% of the Earth’s surface is covered with water, in fact Earth is still the only planet we know where water can exist in liquid form on the surface. Water is also vital for all known forms of life. But there are numerous places on Earth that receive rainfall less than even 0.76 mm annually. One place even receive absolutely no rainfall. Here are the top ten driest places on Earth.
Continue reading Top 10 driest places on Earth