Great white shark fight caught on camera (video)

The Great White Sharks, kings of the seas. They are fearless hunters. And they are big: a mature individual can grow up to 6.4 m (21 ft) in length (there are even reports of great white sharks measuring over 8 m (26 ft), and 3,324 kg (7,328 lb) in weigh). According to wikipedia, “The great white shark has no natural predators other than the Orca.” But this is not always true. Sometimes, great whites attacks and even hunt each other.

Even though the great whites are known to generally avoid conflicts with each other, the phenomenon of cannibalism is not alien to this species. This rare phenomenon, has been caught on camera recently: London-born diver Adam Malski (33) filmed a fight between two great white sharks 50 kilometers off the coast of South Australia’s Neptune Islands.
Continue reading Great white shark fight caught on camera (video)

10 Lesser Known Natural Wonders (I)

The age of the Earth is approximately 4.54 billion years. For all these years, our planet has been a work in progress: water, wind, air pressure, minerals, heat, and even extraterrestrial forces like meteors and comets mold and shape our environment, and created all manner of strange formations. Some of them are really beautiful: we call them “Natural wonders”. Some natural wonders are really famous, for example the Grand Canyon or Victoria Falls. Some of them are lesser known, yet still stunning. Here are the 10 lesser known natural wonders of the World.
Continue reading 10 Lesser Known Natural Wonders (I)

NASA needs your help to identify cities in the night images

Since the “space age” has started in the early 1960s, astronauts have taken more than 1.8 million photographs of the Earth from orbit, and about one-third of them (approximately 600,000) have been taken at night. But they don’t always know what they are looking at. You can help, announced NASA.
Continue reading NASA needs your help to identify cities in the night images

Krakatoa, from space

In August 26-27, 1883, a small island in the Indian Ocean obliterated itself in one the most notorious volcanic eruptions in history. Krakatau (often spelled Krakatoa) erupted with such violence that two-thirds of the island, about 23 square kilometers, sank into the Sunda Strait. The explosions heard in the 1883 eruption remain the loudest noise on human record. The sound was heard across the Indian Ocean, as far away as Rodriguez Island, 4,653 kilometers to the west, and Australia, 3,450 kilometers to the east. The massive eruption also generated a series of tsunamis, which produced waves as high as 30 meters tall.
Continue reading Krakatoa, from space

Will We Ever Visit Other Stars?

The Earth is our one and only home. As Carl Sagan said (Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space), “On Earth, everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”.

But will we ever leave our home and visit other stars in future?
Continue reading Will We Ever Visit Other Stars?