Mister Fred Rogers reading some of Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden’s space poems

The American television personality, musician, puppeteer, writer, and producer “Mister” Fred Rogers (Fred McFeely Rogers, March 20, 1928 – February 27, 2003) reads some of Apollo 15 Astronaut Al Worden’s space poems at his TV show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood”, which ran from 1968 to 2001.

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Will humans go extinct? For all the existential threats, we’ll likely be here for a very long time

Nick Longrich, University of Bath

Will our species go extinct? The short answer is yes. The fossil record shows everything goes extinct, eventually. Almost all species that ever lived, over 99.9%, are extinct.

Some left descendants. Most – plesiosaurs, trilobites, Brontosaurus – didn’t. That’s also true of other human species. Neanderthals, Denisovans, Homo erectus all vanished, leaving just Homo sapiens. Humans are inevitably heading for extinction. The question isn’t whether we go extinct, but when.

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3D-Printed Homes: the Eco-Friendly Home Alternative

There are about 1.6 billion people homeless, according to global homelessness statistics. Construction technology has a chance to change that. Advancements have made it possible to create an entire home by 3D printing it. This type of home construction promises a shorter supply chain and less waste for a sustainable solution. 3D-printed homes also can be eco-friendly home alternatives. The Zebra explains how.

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The Science Behind the Things That Kill Us (And How to Conquer Them)

Whether it’s gorging on junk food, smoking cigarettes, or binge-watching Netflix in lieu of exercise, bad habits are just part of the human experience. But what is it about negative behaviors, products, and lifestyle choices that make them so attractive? And why are they so addicting?

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Utilizing Virtual Reality During Self Isolation

In the wake of the novel coronavirus, almost all of us are settling into life in quarantine. Self-isolation sounds easy enough until the rose-tinted glasses are taken off, with many of us wondering what else – after work, chores, and our favorite tv shows are over – we can do to pass the time. With remote working, homeschool, and online classes freeing up more time in the day, it’s no surprise blogs and social media are populated with listicles, tutorials, and challenges – all championing the cause of taking up a new hobby or interest. Whether it’s craving an escape, craving entertainment, or just craving good old socializing, people are now flocking to virtual reality devices to get their fix.

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The Sun is less active than sibling stars, study shows – here’s what that could mean

Andrew Norton, The Open University

All stars emit varying amounts of light over time – and the Sun is no exception. Such changes in starlight can help us understand how habitable any planets around other stars are – a very active star may bombard its planets with harmful radiation. Now a new study, published in Science, shows that the Sun is significantly less active than other, similar stars.

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How NASA sends probes and rovers to Mars?

Robert Frost, a NASA employee, has shut down a conspiracy theorist on the popular question-answer site Quora. He perfectly explained how NASA sends probes and rovers to Mars. I want t share it here because his answer is so informative and enlightening.

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Coronavirus: we’re in a realtime laboratory of a more sustainable urban future

Paul Chatterton, University of Leeds

A pause has been forced on urban life. Quiet roads, empty skies, deserted high streets and parks, closed cinemas, cafés, and museums – a break in the spending and work frenzy so familiar to us all. The reality of lockdown is making ghost towns of the places we once knew. Everything we know about our urban world has come to a shuddering halt. For now.

The lockdown will, at some point, end. Urban life will begin to hum again to the familiar rhythms of work, leisure and shopping. This will be a huge relief for us all. Yet our towns and cities will never be the same. Indeed, things might get worse before they get better.

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Apollo 13: “Houston, We’ve Had a Problem”

“Houston, we’ve had a problem” (see notes 1 below that post) is the now-famous phrase radioed from Apollo 13 to Mission Control upon the catastrophic explosion that dramatically changed the mission. On the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, NASA recognizes the triumph of the mission control team and the astronauts and looks at the lessons learned. The American space agency commemorates the most “successful failure” in the history of space exploration with the video titled “Apollo 13: Houston, We’ve Had a Problem”.

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