Category Archives: Geography

Your Life On Earth (presented by BBC)

A nice interactive webpage by the BBC – The British Broadcasting Corporation: how you and the world have changed since you were born? You’re simply entering your birth date, gender, and height; selecting units (metric or imperial/US) and then watching how our planet (and you) has changed in your lifetime.

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No! The Earth Would NOT Look Like This Without Water

No, no no, and again: no! The Earth would NOT look like this without water. Please stop sharing this nonsense.

Here some numbers: the Earth has a diameter of about 12,735 kilometers (on average). The highest point on Earth is the top of Mt. Everest, at 8.85 km. The deepest point on Earth is the Mariana Trench, at about 11 km deep. Make the calculations and you can see, the Earth definitely would NOT look like below without water:

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Vulcan Points

Can you imagine an island within a lake that is situated on an island located in a lake on an island? Confused? Well, it is really confusing, but this island does indeed exist: Vulcan Points is the world’s largest island within a lake (Crater Lake) that is situated on an island (Taal Volcano Island) located in a lake (Lake Taal) within an island (Luzon).

Can you see the tiny blue shadow in the south of Manila, the capital city of the Philippines? (In the northernmost island, or Luzon Island.)

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The deepest lake in the World: Lake Baikal

The world’s deepest lake is the Lake Baikal, which has a depth of 1,642 meters (5,387 feet). It is a rift lake in the south of the Russian region of Siberia. Its bottom is at 4,215 feet (1,285 meters) below the sea level. In terms of volume, Lake Baikal is also the world’s largest freshwater lake; it contains roughly 20% of the world’s unfrozen surface fresh water with 23,615.39 cubic kilometers (5,700 cubic miles). It contains more water than that of all the North American Great Lakes combined.

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Maps can be deceptive

The standard maps we see every day use Mercator Projection, a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. It developed for navigational purposes, has often been used in world maps. And like all the other types of projections, it can be deceptive.

In fact, every map tells lie, since it’s impossible to transform perfectly the three-dimensional world into two-dimensional surfaces like paper or computer screen. Map projections are necessary for creating maps and every map projections distort the surface in some fashion (a map projection is a systematic transformation of the latitudes and longitudes of locations on the surface of a sphere or an ellipsoid into locations on a plane).

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