Category Archives: Geology

The deepest lake in the World: Lake Baikal

The world’s deepest lake is the Lake Baikal, which has a depth of 1,642 meters (5,387 feet). It is a rift lake in the south of the Russian region of Siberia. It’s bottom is at 4,215 feet (1,285 meters) below the sea level. In terms of volume, Lake Baikal is also the world’s largest freshwater lake; it contains roughly 20% of the world’s unfrozen surface fresh water with 23,615.39 cubic kilometers (5,700 cubic miles). It contains more water than that of all the Great Lakes combined.
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10 Lesser Known Natural Wonders (I)

The age of the Earth is approximately 4.54 billion years. For all these years, our planet has been a work in progress: water, wind, air pressure, minerals, heat, and even extraterrestrial forces like meteors and comets mold and shape our environment, and created all manner of strange formations. Some of them are really beautiful: we call them “Natural wonders”. Some natural wonders are really famous, for example the Grand Canyon or Victoria Falls. Some of them are lesser known, yet still stunning. Here are the 10 lesser known natural wonders of the World.
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Krakatoa, from space

In August 26-27, 1883, a small island in the Indian Ocean obliterated itself in one the most notorious volcanic eruptions in history. Krakatau (often spelled Krakatoa) erupted with such violence that two-thirds of the island, about 23 square kilometers, sank into the Sunda Strait. The explosions heard in the 1883 eruption remain the loudest noise on human record. The sound was heard across the Indian Ocean, as far away as Rodriguez Island, 4,653 kilometers to the west, and Australia, 3,450 kilometers to the east. The massive eruption also generated a series of tsunamis, which produced waves as high as 30 meters tall.
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