Category Archives: Geology

Timeless Dreams – the Earth in daytime and nighttime

You must watch this! An amazing video by the filmmakers led by Julian Tryba: in May 2015, over the span of three weeks, they traveled in the Southwest of the United States (3,000 miles through Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and California) and filmed timelapses of several strikingly beautiful landscapes. Then they spliced the films together to create this wonderful video, a strange day-night world.

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Your Life On Earth (presented by BBC)

A nice interactive webpage by the BBC – The British Broadcasting Corporation: how you and the world have changed since you were born? You’re simply entering your birth date, gender, and height; selecting units (metric or imperial/US) and then watching how our planet (and you) has changed in your lifetime.

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No! The Earth Would NOT Look Like This Without Water

No, no no, and again: no! The Earth would NOT look like this without water. Please stop sharing this nonsense.

Here some numbers: the Earth has a diameter of about 12,735 kilometers (on average). The highest point on Earth is the top of Mt. Everest, at 8.85 km. The deepest point on Earth is the Mariana Trench, at about 11 km deep. Make the calculations and you can see, the Earth definitely would NOT look like below without water:

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Vulcan Points

Can you imagine an island within a lake that is situated on an island located in a lake on an island? Confused? Well, it is really confusing, but this island does indeed exist: Vulcan Points is the world’s largest island within a lake (Crater Lake) that is situated on an island (Taal Volcano Island) located in a lake (Lake Taal) within an island (Luzon).

Can you see the tiny blue shadow in the south of Manila, the capital city of the Philippines? (In the northernmost island, or Luzon Island.)

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The deepest lake in the World: Lake Baikal

The world’s deepest lake is the Lake Baikal, which has a depth of 1,642 meters (5,387 feet). It is a rift lake in the south of the Russian region of Siberia. Its bottom is at 4,215 feet (1,285 meters) below the sea level. In terms of volume, Lake Baikal is also the world’s largest freshwater lake; it contains roughly 20% of the world’s unfrozen surface fresh water with 23,615.39 cubic kilometers (5,700 cubic miles). It contains more water than that of all the North American Great Lakes combined.

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Calbuco volcano (Chile) erupts – amazing video

The Calbuco volcano in southern Chile has erupted twice and the people have been evacuated. It is the first eruption of the stratovolcano in 42 years; results in huge ash cloud over a mountainous area in the south of Chile.

The amazing footage from the area shows a huge column of lava and ash being sent several kilometers into the air.

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10 Lesser Known Natural Wonders (I)

The age of the Earth is approximately 4.54 billion years. For all these years, our planet has been a work in progress: water, wind, air pressure, minerals, heat, and even extraterrestrial forces like meteors and comets mold and shape our environment, and created all manner of strange formations. Some of them are really beautiful: we call them “Natural wonders”. Some natural wonders are really famous, for example, the Grand Canyon or Victoria Falls. Some of them are lesser known, yet still stunning. Here are the 10 lesser known natural wonders of the World.

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Krakatoa, from space

On August 26-27, 1883, a small island in the Indian Ocean obliterated itself in one the most notorious volcanic eruptions in history. Krakatau (often spelled Krakatoa) erupted with such violence that two-thirds of the island, about 23 square kilometers, sank into the Sunda Strait. The explosions heard in the 1883 eruption remain the loudest noise on human record. The sound was heard across the Indian Ocean, as far away as Rodriguez Island, 4,653 kilometers (2,891 miles) to the west, and Australia, 3,450 kilometers (2,144 miles) to the east. The massive eruption also generated a series of tsunamis, which produced waves as high as 30 meters (98 feet) tall.

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