Category Archives: Earth from Space

Ultra HD Video from the International Space Station

An amazing ultra high definition video, from the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has introduced a new 4K Ultra High-Definition (UHD) video, providing an unprecedented look at what it’s like to live and work aboard the International Space Station.

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The deepest lake in the World: Lake Baikal

The world’s deepest lake is the Lake Baikal, which has a depth of 1,642 meters (5,387 feet). It is a rift lake in the south of the Russian region of Siberia. Its bottom is at 4,215 feet (1,285 meters) below the sea level. In terms of volume, Lake Baikal is also the world’s largest freshwater lake; it contains roughly 20% of the world’s unfrozen surface fresh water with 23,615.39 cubic kilometers (5,700 cubic miles). It contains more water than that of all the North American Great Lakes combined.

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Live HD streaming Of Earth (From The ISS – International Space Station)

When I was a child, I always dreamed about watching Earth from the space. Back in the 1980s, we were almost sure that around the year 2000, the space travel would be so common. Remember TV shows like “Space: 1999”. Unfortunately, the space race lost its momentum during the 1990s and 2000s.

But thanks to the Internet and computer science, we all able to see the earth from the space. And live! And HD! 24 hours a day (the feed will sometimes go down as the signal switches between the cameras – the screen is grey when the cameras are down)!

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The first earthrise ever seen directly by humans

On December 24, 1968, the crew of Apollo 8, the second human spaceflight mission in the US Apollo space program, were the first humans to witness Earthrise. The “Earthrise” is photographed by astronauts on board Apollo 8. It is one of the most famous photos ever taken and became the symbol of one the greatest explorations in history: human’s first journey to another world, and when the crewmembers looked back, they saw their home planet.

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NASA needs your help to identify cities in the night images

Since the “space age” has started in the early 1960s, astronauts have taken more than 1.8 million photographs of the Earth from orbit, and about one-third of them (approximately 600,000) have been taken at night. But they don’t always know what they are looking at. You can help, announced NASA.

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Krakatoa, from space

On August 26-27, 1883, a small island in the Indian Ocean obliterated itself in one the most notorious volcanic eruptions in history. Krakatau (often spelled Krakatoa) erupted with such violence that two-thirds of the island, about 23 square kilometers, sank into the Sunda Strait. The explosions heard in the 1883 eruption remain the loudest noise on human record. The sound was heard across the Indian Ocean, as far away as Rodriguez Island, 4,653 kilometers (2,891 miles) to the west, and Australia, 3,450 kilometers (2,144 miles) to the east. The massive eruption also generated a series of tsunamis, which produced waves as high as 30 meters (98 feet) tall.

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Pale Blue Dot

The farthest spacecraft from Earth, NASA’s Voyager 1 Notes 1 probe took a photo of planet Earth in 1990, from a record distance of about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles, 40 AU) from Earth. The photo is known as the Pale Blue Dot. In the photograph, Earth is shown as a fraction of a pixel (0.12 pixel in size) against the vastness of space. It was a part of the solar system Family Portrait series of images.

The Voyager 1 spacecraft, which had completed its primary mission and was leaving the Solar System, was commanded by NASA to turn its camera around and to take a photograph of Earth across a great expanse of space, at the request of Carl Sagan Notes 2.

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