Human Population Through Time (Video)

The Earth is getting more crowded every single day. As of August 2016, the world population was estimated at 7.4 billion. Our planet is already overpopulated, and despite the growth of the population begun slowing, the situation will be worse: the United Nations estimates it will further increase to 11.2 billion in the year 2100.

Here is a video published by the American Museum of Natural History showing the World’s population through time.

“It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’ resources, even as we approach 11 billion?”

Continue reading Human Population Through Time (Video)

Nord (Amazing Drone Footage of Iceland and Norway)

Earth is an amazing place full of stories, beauty an natural wonders. Here is an amazing drone footage of Iceland and Norway, from volcanic landscapes and geysers of Iceland to the fjords of Norway. The video is titled “Nord” (Catalan, Danish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian and Swedish for north), captured during a summer trip to Norway and Iceland in August 2016. The accompanying music is also beautiful. Enjoy!

Continue reading Nord (Amazing Drone Footage of Iceland and Norway)

How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth’s circumference

In 240 BC, the Greek astronomer, geographer, mathematician, music theorist and librarian Eratosthenes of Cyrene (c. 276 BC – c. 195/194 BC) calculated the circumference of the Earth without even leaving Egypt. Here’s how:

Eratosthenes knew that at local noon on the summer solstice (at the time of the longest day, about 21 June in the northern hemisphere) in Syene (modern Aswan, Egypt), the Sun was directly overhead – Syene was in fact slightly north of the tropic, though (1). Local noon is – technically when the sub-solar point is somewhere over your meridian, it’s noon for you. So, on that day, Syene is the sub-solar point of Earth (the sub-solar point on a planet is where its sun is perceived to be directly overhead). To learn more about the local noon and the subsolar point, see the article titled “How Earth Moves“.

Continue reading How Eratosthenes calculated the Earth’s circumference

8 Famous Places to See Before They Have Vanished

There are a lot of natural and human-made wonders in the world. But everything has an end, and sooner or later, they’ll be gone. Unfortunately, some of them will be vanished sooner, even in a few decades. Here are eight of them, just in case you may want to see before they are gone.

Continue reading 8 Famous Places to See Before They Have Vanished

The Sixth Major Extinction Event

In the past, there were five major extinction event (a widespread and rapid decrease in the biodiversity on Earth), and a lot of minor ones. Now, we are in the middle of the sixth one, called “Holocene extinction event”. And the cause is… guess what? Humans.

According to the WWF’s (World Wildlife Fund) new Living Planet Report (2016), now we are in the middle of the biggest mass extinction on Earth, since the dinosaurs, which was around 65 million years ago. And the world set to lose two-thirds of its wildlife by as close as 2020.

Continue reading The Sixth Major Extinction Event

Gator Uses Bait Stick to Catch Egrets (Video)

An alligator’s brain weighs only 8 or 9 grams, and it has the size of a walnut, but that doesn’t mean they are stupid. In fact, they’re much smarter than you’d think. In Everglades National Park in the United States, a 400-pound (181 kg) gator displays a clever way and uses a bait branch stick to catch egrets during the breeding season.

Continue reading Gator Uses Bait Stick to Catch Egrets (Video)